Health Bioinformatics and Personalised Medicine

Health Bioinformatics and Personalised Medicine

Group Leader: Ole Lund

It is anticipated that in the coming years there will be an opportunity for improving health by introducing informatics models that combine the many complex and heterogeneous health-related data types such as high resolution spatial and temporal genomic and proteomic data, clinical data covering disease status and treatment, and imaging- and metabolomics data for observing phenotypes at molecular to organismal scales.

Bioinformatics has evolved beyond sequence analysis it is now about large data, multiple layers of additional, sensitive, heterogeneous and complex data making knowledge extraction, security and scaling some of the main topics.

The main future research challenges are related to handling and interpretation of these large-scale heterogeneous data, and our research strategy is focused on developing tools to address these challenges and apply them to data sets to generate biological insights. Methods development is strongest when done in close collaboration with applied needs and realities. Data characterizing biological systems and populations are always incomplete, yet heterogeneous complementary data sources can provide key intelligence to yield mechanistic and predictive insights.

Our research aims at developing analysis systems that utilize biological understanding to expand biological knowledge and create the tools for tomorrow's health care. These insights may be used to tailor medical interventions to different patient groups or individual patients based on their predicted response or risk of disease. One example is the development of tools for quantifying genetic loci from the microbiome that enable bacterial production of small molecules that interact with other bacteria or the human host, negatively or positively. This allows us to identify potential molecular mediators of disease risk, and with the use of metagenomic data from patients point out microbial contributors to pathogenicity. Metabolomics as an additional layer will allow us to directly track the production of these molecules. This higher resolution picture of the gut microbiome enables better prediction of risk and suggests future targets for intervention.

This work requires close collaboration with clinicians, industry and wet-lab researchers to ensure that our research is applicable in the real world, and we are actively building collaborations for this purpose.

Contact

Ole Lund
Professor
DTU Health Tech

Contact

Asker Brejnrod
Postdoc
DTU Health Tech
+45 91 76 07 77